"Boyz N the Hood" - A Film Analysis Film Review by Nicky

A look at the female characters in the 1991 film "Boyz N the Hood."
# 150335 | 1,112 words | 0 sources | 2012 | US
Published on Jan 31, 2012 in Women Studies (Women and Society)


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Description:

This paper analyzes the portrayal of female characters in the film "Boyz N the Hood", showing how they are represented in three different ways. According to the paper, there are commonly accepted delineations in the Hip-Hop community about women, these being referred to as (1) "baby mamas", (2) "chicken heads", and (3) professional women. The characteristics are described and the paper further notes that since 1991, relatively little has changed in so far as the degree to which those same characterizations still apply in the Hip Hop community. Additionally,the paper notes how gender relations are represented in the film. The paper also explores how in many respects these relations are merely symptoms of a much more general problem of misogyny and the general lack of mutual respect for females in many areas of American social culture, especially in the Hip-Hop community. The paper concludes by stating that the images and characterizations about women presented in the filmdo represent values, beliefs and attitudes of males in the Hip-Hop community.

Outline:

Introduction - Types of Female Characteriz
Gender Relations in the Movie
Symptoms of a Much Larger Social Issue

From the Paper:

"In many respects, the gender relations illustrated in Boyz 'N the Hood are merely symptoms of a much more general problem of misogyny and the general lack of mutual respect for females in many areas of American social culture, especially in the Hip-Hop community. Both Tre's early relationship with Brandi and Rickie's relationship with the mother of his baby illustrate the psychological distance that males maintain between themselves and their female partners, even within romantic and domestic relationships respectively. Neither woman is involved in her partner's life in the same way as the male friends. Instead, they remain within a highly compartmentalized role and kept almost completely separate without significant integration into their lives.
"If anything, that dynamic is only a relatively mild version of the prevailing general lack of respect for all women within the Hip-Hop community. Within the film, Doughboy's comments during his "Welcome Home" barbeque that "Ho's gotta' eat too" directed at all the female attendants rather than just to any who happen to fit that specific pejorative characterization. This, in fact, is a concept that is epidemic both within the Hip-Hop community and also in many other segments of American society..."

Cite this Film Review:

APA Format

"Boyz N the Hood" - A Film Analysis (2012, January 31) Retrieved October 31, 2014, from http://www.academon.com/film-review/boyz-n-the-hood-a-film-analysis-150335/

MLA Format

""Boyz N the Hood" - A Film Analysis" 31 January 2012. Web. 31 October. 2014. <http://www.academon.com/film-review/boyz-n-the-hood-a-film-analysis-150335/>

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